Protests against state orders continue, adding pressure to ease restrictions | WNWO NBC 24

Protests Against State Orders Continue, Adding Pressure to Ease Restrictions

Protests against state orders continue, adding pressure to ease restrictions | WNWO NBC 24

Over the weekend, protesters across the country made it clear they have lost faith in their government’s ability to manage the crisis.

President Donald Trump expressed sympathy for the protesters on Sunday.

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President Donald Trump expressed sympathy for the protesters on Sunday.

“They’ve got cabin fever,” Trump said. “They want to get back. They want their life back. Their life was taken away from them.”

Trump said some governors “have gotten carried away.”

Trump was likely referring to governors like Michigan’s Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, and Vermont’s Phil Scott, a Republican, who banned the sale of many nonessential goods.

Some believe the inconsistency in restrictions across states is eroding public trust.

“People can cross borders in lots of places very easily and go to a different store in a different state,” American University Washington College of Law Professor Lindsay Wiley said. “The outbreak affects different places differently. There are outbreaks that are more severe in some places than in others and those conditions may change rapidly over time.”

Whitmer has justified her state’s strict orders as necessary as the state has the third-most coronavirus deaths.

coronavirus-CNN-News
coronavirus | CNN News

Many protesters believe their governors have violated their constitutional rights with strict stay-at-home orders. Wiley said these rights are not absolute.

“My right to do as I wish ends where it could cause harm to you,” Wiley said.

Wiley said local governments could do more to garner public trust.

“Flattening the curve doesn’t require perfection but what it does require is a widespread public trust, widespread voluntary cooperation,” Wiley said. “And any kind of harsh police crackdown in an effort to achieve perfection could actually erode the public’s trust, erode that cooperation in the long term and be bad from a public health standpoint.”

Many governors are troubled to see protesters standing close to one another, many of them not wearing masks who could easily be spreading the virus.

“Anybody who thinks we’re doing this just to take away people’s liberties and rights, it’s looking at the data that we’re looking at,” Democratic New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said. “We’re doing what we’re doing to try and save lives.”

Some protesters even took issue with Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert.

On Monday morning, Fauci urged protesters to consider the consequences of lifting guidelines too soon.

“If you jump the gun and go into it where you have a big spike, you’re gonna set yourself back,” Fauci told ABC’s, George Stephanopoulos. “So as painful as it is to go by the careful guidelines of gradually phasing into a reopening, it’s gonna backfire.” This article is written by AHTRA ELNASHAR, Sinclair Broadcast Group and issued by WJLA NEWS.

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